Church & Almshouses

The main focus of the Company’s support is for its eight Church of England Patronages and for Clergy in the Dioceses of London and Southwark through their Bishop's Discretionary Fund.

In addition, the Company arranges the “Golden Lecture” each year, usually given by a Church of England clergyman, in a City Church. The Golden Lecture owes its origins to William Jones, one of the Company’s earliest benefactors. Please see the "Downloads" section in the Members' area for downloadable transcripts of recent Golden Lectures.

 

St. Peter's, Chertsey

Vicar: Revd Tim Hillier
Curate: Revd Eils Shipton
Assistant Minister: Revd Christine Pattinson

Dame Mary Weld by her Will dated 1623 gave money for the purchase of patronages, one of which was St. Peter's with All Saints is the Parish Church of Chertsey and lies on the banks of the River Thames in Surrey. This historic town has a population of around 11,000 and has been served by the church since the early Middle Ages.

 

St Peter's Chertsey

St. Peter's is a lively, growing parish church in the centre of Chertsey, Surrey. We have a staff team including Vicar, Curate, Assistant Minister, Family Worker and Youth worker. In addition to the parish church we have planted congregations at Penton Park and Pyrcroft School in recent years. Our worship is varied and largely informal in style but with weekly services from the Book of Common Prayer also.

We are a training parish for curates within Guildford Diocese and also have oversight of a smaller country parish of Lyne and Longcross. We greatly value our relationship with the Haberdashers Company.

Further information can be obtained from our website: www.stpeterschertsey.org.uk or from our Facebook Page.

 

St John the Baptist, Hoxton

Incumbent: The Revd Graham Hunter 

This patronage results from the former Jones Lectureship Charity. In 1866 the site of three houses owned by the Charity was required for the construction of a new road running from the Embankment to Mansion House in the City of London. The Charity was expanded to include three parishes, which received substantial grants from the payment received for the site.

 

St John's Hoxton

St John's Hoxton, completed in 1826, is the only church built to the design of Francis Edwards, Sir John Soane's foremost pupil. In Victorian London the parish's work was recognised by social campaigners, not least the philanthropist Charles Booth, for its welfare work in a deteriorating inner-city environment. To give opportunities to the "local poor", the first Vicar founded what became London's largest savings bank, and St John's National Schools, which still thrive. From its hugely popular Sunday Schools the church sent many missionaries to Africa and Asia, amongst them the first Bishop of Chota Nagpur, the Rt Revd Jabez Cornelius Whiteley, whose father was Chaplain to the Haberdashers' Aske's Hospital School formerly located in Pitfield Street.

St John’s is a neighbourhood church with a vision to 'be a beacon of hope for Hoxton’. It is a multi-generational, multi-national, multi-ethnic and multi-cultural church, with around 180 adults and children worshipping every week across its two Sunday services. It hosts and resources a range of midweek activities, with a special emphasis on work with children and young people, as well as on work amongst the poor and marginalised. It has close connections with its attached primary school. 

Its mission statement is summarised by four activities:

Worship God
Make Disciples
Share Jesus
Transform Hoxton

 

 

St. Mary Magdalene Church, Albrighton

Incumbent: The Revd Mary Wade

Dame Mary Weld by her Will dated 1623 gave money for the purchase of  patronages, one of which was Albrighton, Shropshire  (now the United Benetice of Albrighton, Boningale and Donington)

St. Mary Magdalene Church, Albrighton is one of the oldest in Shropshire. There is an imposing pre-Norman cross in the churchyard. Construction of the church commenced in 1120. The north aisle was completed in 1256, the chancel in the 1300s and the south aisle in 1794 giving the church its form today. The Church was fully renovated following a major appeal in 1992 and rededicated in November 1994.

 

St Mary's Albrighton

The name Albrighton comes from a Saxon called Alberic who settled in the 7th Century and "Albristone", or "Alberic’s Town", is mentioned in the Domesday book. The village population remained static at 900 for many centuries but since 1935 has grown rapidly to over 4,500.  In 2008 a pastoral measure created a United Benefice with two adjoining parishes; St Chad's, Boningale and St Cuthbert's Donington.  The Company is now joint Patron for the United Benefice with the Martyrs Memorial Trust.

 

Wigston Magna - Leicester

Incumbent: The Revd Trevor Thurston-Smith

Dame Mary Weld by her Will dated 1623 gave money for the purchase of patronages, one of which was Wigston Magna, Leicestershire 

The parish, with a population of 26,000, is in the borough of Oadby and Wigston, close to the City of Leicester. It is now joined to Leicester but was once a separate village. The church of All Saints’, Wigston Magna was built of local Enderby granite between 1280 and 1320 in the Medieval Gothic (Decorated) style and replaced an earlier church on the site.  There is also a small Church dedicated to St Wiston in the Parish which evolved from a shrine dedicated to this local Saint. Regular services are also held here.

 

Wigston Magna

There is a Church Room used extensively by the people of the church and not far away is All Saints' Church of England Primary School, with over 300 pupils, with a Community Centre.  The Parish has recently agreed to join with the neighbouring parish of South Wigston to create a new United Benefice.  The legal formalities are being conducted alongside the appointment process for a new rector, who will work with the current incumbent of St Thomas' church South Wigston.

 

Newnham with Awre & Blakeney, Gloucestershire 

Incumbent: The Revd Rob James

Edmund Hammond, Freeman 1598, by his will of 1638 gave the Company a sum to purchase Church livings. The two livings purchased were Awre and Blakeney which were later combined with a neighbouring parish team to become "The United Benefice of Newnham with Awre and Blakeney".  All three Parishes continue to have their own feel and traditions.

Awre is a small rural community. It has no main road passing through it and has a population of around 160. It has a very high percentage of regular worshippers. The church is interesting, ancient and quite large, with a peal of 6 bells. The main road down the River Severn valley used to pass through the village and so in previous centuries it was somewhat more important than now.

Blakeney, by contrast, is a large geographical parish with a population of around 1500. It has a very small but highly committed congregation.

 

Revd Rob James and Wardens

  

All Saints', Hatcham

Incumbent: The Revd Canon Owen Beament, MBE

This patronage results from the former Jones Lectureship Charity. In 1866 the site of three houses owned by the Charity was required for the construction of a new road running from the Embankment to Mansion House in the City of London. The Charity was expanded to include three parishes, which received substantial grants from the payment received for the site.

All Saints is situated at the East end of the Old Kent Road, and while in the Borough of Lewisham, the parish covers part of Peckham and South Bermondsey. The area - which coincides with Marlowe Ward - is reputedly one of the poorest in London, but there is nonetheless a vibrancy in the Church and Community.

 

All Saints' Hatcham

The services are well attended for an inner city parish, and the congregation is multinational. There are at least ten different nationalities represented at services on Sundays. There is a large and busy community centre at the Church, used by some 35 different groups, ranging from culture groups to dog training and bingo to youth clubs. As part of the centre there is a much used "drop-in" area open to all from 10am to 3pm on weekdays.

The church is involved with local schools - not least Haberdashers' Aske's Hatcham College - and has close links with local organisations, especially Millwall Football Club. The church runs Children's Holiday schemes and community transport as part of its service to the community.

 

St Boniface, Bunbury

Incumbent: The Revd Tim Hayward

Under the will of Thomas Aldersey the Company was appointed patron of Bunbury, Cheshire in 1594 as part of an ambitious project to benefit local people, including the foundation of Bunbury School.  The Parish is part of a United Benefice with St Jude’s Church, Tilstone Fearnall

Bunbury Church dates from Saxon times and is one of a few Anglican churches dedicated to St. Boniface (680-754 A.D.), Missionary and Saint. The wooden Saxon church was destroyed by the Normans who erected a small stone church. In c.1300 a gothic church, of the present-day ground plan, was built. The lower tower and part of the chancel still remain.

 

Vicar at Bunbury

In 1386 Bunbury Church came into the possession of Sir Hugh Calveley who founded a College and adapted the church for his own purposes. Sir Hugh's College was dissolved in 1547 when the Crown assumed administration of the tithes and patronage. In the late sixteenth century the London Haberdasher, Thomas Aldersey, purchased these rights. The rights of patronage passed from the Aldersey family to The Worshipful Company of Haberdashers.

During the Civil War the church was "fired" by the Royalists but was restored after the conflict. Nave and tower galleries were installed in Jacobean times, but these were all removed, together with the ancient boxpews, in 1865. This mid-Victorian work resulted in the church interior reverting to its former open medieval form. In 1940 the church was extensively damaged when a German parachute bomb exploded nearby. After necessary post-war restorations Bunbury church remains a cherished, perpendicular-style, medieval church and is Grade 1 listed.

 

 

St. Catherine's, Hatcham

Incumbent: The Revd Sheridan James

This patronage results from the former Jones Lectureship Charity. In 1866 the site of three houses owned by the Charity was required for the construction of a new road running from the Embankment to Mansion House in the City of London. The Charity was expanded to include three parishes, which received substantial grants from the payment received for the site.

In 1892 the Haberdashers' Company provided the land and money to build the church in Telegraph Hill Park, London. 

 

St. Catherine's Hatcham

Over the last 100 years St Catherine's has been sustained by the regular contributions of countless people, both clergy and laity, keeping faith with the church and parish. There have been two major fires at St Catherine, in 1913 and 1940, following which the Haberdashers' Aske's Boys School was used for services and kept the church alive throughout the war.

In 1972 the western end of the church was incorporated in the new Telegraph Hill Centre, a community resource for learning and social activities for the neighbourhood.

 

ALMSHOUSES

The Company has a long history of providing almshouse accommodation for older people in need who have lived for a number of years in the area of benefit of the charities concerned.

There are two almshouse charities with which the Company is Associated:

(a)  WILLIAM JONES’S ALMSHOUSE CHARITY

William Jones, Liveryman, a native of Newland in the Forest of Dean, made his fortune in London and in 1614 gave money to the Company to fund almshouses at Monmouth.  By his will he bequeathed further money for this purpose and for the establishment of a school at Monmouth and further almshouses at Newland in Gloucestershire.

Until recently the charity had almshouses in Monmouth and Newland.  The Company decided to concentrate its almshouse activities in Monmouth, near to all facilities, and to close the Newland almshouses. Newland lacked amenities and the accommodation, built in 1616, was difficult to modernise.  Bristol Charities, which runs almshouses and facilities for older people in Bristol was appointed to lead the redevelopment of the Monmouth almshouses and was appointed as manager of both almshouses with effect from January 2007.  The Company has now transferred trusteeship of the William Jones’s Almshouse Charity to Bristol Charities. The residents of both Monmouth and Newland were relocated to alternative accommodation while work to redevelop the site at Monmouth took place. Former residents have been offered homes in the new development which was completed in May 2013.

 

(b) WILLIAM ADAMS’ ELEEMOSYNARY CHARITY

This charity was founded by the same William Adams who started Adams’ Grammar School in Newport, Shropshire.  There are almshouse cottages in the High Street in Newport, on either side of the original School gates and on property surrounded by the School.  The Headmaster, local Rector and others form the Electors, who are responsible for recommending the appointment of new residents.  The Company is corporate Trustee of this charity.